Posts Tagged ‘Facebook’

1 year and 9 months. That’s exactly how long I’ve abandoned this little cozy space.

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Photo by : Ko Thawng Thang

I don’t want to be a hypocrite

Say I wanted to criticize about a group of people in Burma regarding how they’d been doing business there. Then, I’d ask myself “What kind of very successful business do you have to validate that statement”? Snap! I deleted the draft. Or say I liked to blog about “how networking is not for very honest people who can’t pretend a bit” (because I personally dislike it). My inner self would ask me “Have you not pretended once among many strangers?”. And there goes another post into the bin.

Basically, I attempted to. But couldn’t conclude anything. My usual writer / blogger / whatever block.

I’m tired of Burma

As someone who have been spending almost all of her years in 20s abroad, I still feel as if I am one of most practical bridges to connect occurrences  and those who have no clue about Burma. And obviously Burma is major topic on this blog. But I tend to be sick of it.

I could have blogged about first ever chance to vote in my entire life, hype about election or some lamest things you couldn’t imagine elsewhere. But I am really tired of it.

I hate doing what everyone’s doing since I was little. I hate following the hype unless it draws immense attention to me. Likewise, when every ones’s rushing to talk about Burma, I feel bored.

I Spent Way Too Much Time on Facebook

You might say “You don’t say” or “It happens to everyone of us”. But then, I suppose I could use an excuse or two saying I need to keep track of what is actually happening on Facebook everyday because that’s basically part of how I am earning money right now.

I am not a privacy freak and I would not agree with those cartoons screaming “Social networks destroy our real social connections” and stuff like that. But still. It took quite a fair share of my time and I rarely wanted to write elsewhere.

Regardless,

I’m back. Both to this blog and soon to Yangon. I don’t know if I’m disappointed or excited at this point. I am slightly scared of reversed culture-shock, though. Many people forecasted that I wouldn’t be able to live in Yangon! So, we’ll see.

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Since it was unblocked in 2011, Facebook in Burma has become a platform for sectarian hate speech and propaganda

Since June 2012, when violence broke out between Rohingya and Buddhists in RakhineState, Facebook has become a platform where propagandists mislead social network users in Burma on what seems like a daily basis. There is increasing concern about the number of Burmese Internet users misusing their newfound access to social media. In reality, social networking is not that new to Burmese Internet users, but using it for online propaganda is.

Despite low penetration and strict control of the Internet, active debate on all major religions on Burmese forums did exist for a number of years prior to 2012, with little evidence of animosities spilling into the offline world. Although the country was closed in many ways, people seemed to be more open-minded. Burmese Internet users were allowed access to Facebook in September 2011. However, it is not the only root cause of hate speech and online propaganda since Burmese Facebook users seemed calm until the Rohingya issue emerged in mid-2012.

This falsified image appeared on a Burmese Facebook page alleging killings by Burmese monks. It actually shows Tibetan monks helping out after the 2010 earthquake in China. Pic: Facebook.Since then, fabricated news and falsified images have come from several Facebook accounts with unknown identities. Buddhists portray Muslims as extremists and terrorists while Muslims say Buddhists as racists. Hoaxes are everywhere. Monks from Tibet helping out after a disaster became Buddhist monks killing Rohingya. Infants from orphanages were falsely portrayed as Burmese children displaced by Rohingya rioters.

The situation intensified again recently after the Meikhtila riots. Extremist Facebook pages and accounts with thousands of followers have stoked the tensions with images and stories that cannot be verified. Images from alleged crime scenes – the dead body of a Rakhine girl reportedly raped and killed by three Muslims in June, the burnt body of a Buddhist monk allegedly killed by Muslims in Meikhtila and a video of Buddhist monk threatening to kill Muslims – are all questionable. The “unknown” sources recorded those and uploaded to Facebook, where they spread like wildfire. More interesting is that these are not images and videos likely to be captured by average members of the public, and security forces were included in some videos.

Read more on AsianCorrespondent.

My Myanmar friends from U.S are rarely active on Facebook. So, I browsed on of my BFFs wall few minutes ago and it notified me that I can now send real gift via Facebook to those in U.S!! You can even choose occasion, gift cards, write your own message and pay for it. There are many inexpensive items. And privacy? It seems safe since only when the recepient provided their address, it will be sent!

Real Gift on Facebook

Choose your gift

Add a virtual gift card and sweet words.

Add a virtual gift card and sweet words.

Pay and done!

Pay and done!

You might say “Uh.. okay”, but for me, I suppose it could bring endless possibilities. Let’s think out loud what we can do with it (assuming this feature will be expanded to other countries from time to time.)

Warmth from virtual world
Lately, I do not really say Happy Birthday on Facebook to those who are not close friends of mine. Not only because I think it’s useless but also I like to make my friends believe that I do feel like wishing in person by doing so only to certain people in my friend list. But I sometimes feel like I could send something physical to them – be it a little card or something just to make them realize I do remember their birthdays from bottom of my heart. But I don’t think someone would bother to actully buy something even via online shopping and prepare to send it to them just because it takes time and boring. But then again, now that Facebook comes out with such thing, I would definitely buy small things on my friend birthday. I need to click only about 5 times and viola, your gift will be sent to their doors! With only about 10 bucks, you can pass your love virtually that will be transformed into something tangible to your loved ones. I mean, what a cool way!

Romance, Suprise and Fun
Some people take Facebook too seriously. In Myanmar, it’s almost a ground for propagandists. (Okay, I’ll leave this out in such a fun post.) But for me, Facebook basically should be a fun place to be connected with your loved ones. Let’s say you have crash on someone. *wink* He/she and you are friends on Facebook but you like to take a step forward. Then, this option will be perfect! If you want to make him/her suprised more, you can do so from another Facebook account that does not reveal your real identity. (But that would only work if your crush is eager to take risk of accepting a gift from an anonymous. For me, I would accept since the gifts are legal ones and you can’t prepare your own to send me something nasty) It could be a new way of starting a relationship – a hybrid version of online and offline.

Frenemies Vanished
Occasionally, we lose our friends via heated discussions on Facebook. After some time, you might want to get togther with them again but not sure where to start. Why don’t we start it again by sending a little warm gift via Facebook? I mean, since Facebook is the one who involved in your frenemy story, shouldn’t it be the same thing to engage you guys again? If he/she doesn’t bother even after receiving gift with nice message to be friended again, just don’t bother! lol

Corporate Gratitude?
You went to a business related dinner and want to say “Thank you” to whoever had invited you. Instead of just posting “Thanks for tonight!!!” on their wall, why can’t we send them a nice small gift with “thank you” message. They would definitely recognize you among those who came to dinner!

Note : When I read it back, it sounds a lot like I'm advertising for Facebook. Hell no, I'm just having fun with it as I'm happy to be on Facebook with my loved ones. I even dreamt to watch movies directly from Facebook instead of opening new tab in browser. ;)

23rd century

Dear 23rd century world citizens,

I hoped you found this letter directly via my CD.

Some valuable information  for historians among you or some weird unbelievable random facts for scientists.
  1. We, 21st century human, used a technology (or a crap?) called electronic mail which took at least seconds to get the letter sent.
  2. Half of our age was spent using Facebook where we could be officially curious and gossiped others’ known or unknown facts and shockingly the victims were happy for it.
  3. We took care of animals, killed them and consumed them.
  4. We were scared of heat. At the same time, we were producing heat.
  5. We did had icebergs on earth!
  6. Some of us were dying to drink a drop of water while some showered for  1hour+ and others were making money using water.
  7. Normally, we worked for five days and took rest for two days (which might be directly opposite to you.)
  8. One popular word (with unknown definition) in our age was “love” which couldn’t be seen in your dictionary.
  9. We went and watched sports matches, shows, events & went even to battle ground in person.
  10. We were necessary to learn various languages only with the purpose to communicate. (No, not with others, just with human beings like us.)
  11. We were afraid of (or gave respect) to those we hadn’t seen.
  12. We were crazy with dates especially in the month I wrote this because it possessed 10/10/10 & 20/10/2010. Have you passed 22/02/2202?

P.S What you read right now was written on a square surface called computer using a service called blog what was especially used for shouting our emotion out to strangers or as a proof of we were intelligent enough to use latest technology (at that time, I meant).

With Love Brain,

A 21st century citizen.